January
31
Author
Jubilee+
Partnering With Jubilee+




ChristCentral has had the privilege of being involved in supporting the work of Jubilee+ since it’s early days as a charity. It’s been a real joy to see how the work that they are doing has grown in stature and developed in the intervening years. 

We’d love to encourage you to partner more specifically with Jubilee+ and enable them to increase their reach and impact in the future. 

H
ere is a short video from Natalie Williams who will become the chief executive of Jubilee+ in April 2021, as Martin Charlesworth will begin to take on more of an ambassadorial role.



How can I partner with Jubilee+?
Individuals:
To find out more about partnering with Jubilee+ click here
Partner Churches: 
To find out more about becoming a partner church click here.

More about Jubilee Plus:
The Jubilee+ vision is to see the Church in the UK be a champion of the poor and a means to healthy communities across the nation.

This is a big vision. It’s based on the fact that we believe we serve a big God whose heart is (and has always been) especially inclined towards the poor. We also believe that His Church has a responsibility not only to care for and empower those in need, but also to speak up on behalf of the voiceless.

Our vision goes beyond seeing individual lives transformed – as important as that is – to seeing entire neighbourhoods and communities strengthened so that our society as a whole is healthier. Our conviction is that when churches are at the heart of social action, social justice and social enterprise, society flourishes.

Jubilee+ was formed in 2011 and we have been on quite an exciting adventure since then. Since our inception we have run many national conferences, spoken at numerous events around the country, delivered training to churches across the UK, held roadshows, lobbied politicians and other key decision-makers, published our first book – The Myth of the Undeserving Poor, conducted some insightful research into the difference churches are making in their localities, gained charitable status, and had regular contact with a wide range of churches of various denominations in the UK.